Lilly diabetes drug Trulicity leapfrogs to No. 2 ad spender for June

watching tv
Pharma ads on TV held steady in June with only a slight spending dip among the top 10 advertisers, but with AbbVie's Humira well out in front for the year. (iStock/AndreaObzerov)

With six months down in 2018 and six to go, Humira is on track to keep its pharma TV spending crown for 2018. AbbVie spent $184 million on anti-inflammatory drug Humira across its three indications for the first six months of the year, according to data from real-time TV ad tracker iSpot.tv, compared with just $158 million during the same time period in 2017.

The TV spending uptick goes hand-in-hand with analysts’ soaring sales expectations that Humira will top $20 billion in sales this year, becoming the first drug ever to pass that threshold.

But in June, there was a new No. 2. Pfizer’s Lyrica stayed back in its No. 3 slot for the second month in a row—it’s typically No. 2—while Eli Lilly’s Trulicity jumped up to that second place. Metastatic breast cancer fighter Verzenio, new to the list last month, stayed in the top 10 at No. 7.

Humira did launch one new spot for psoriatic arthritis at the end of May, and it spent more than one-third ($10.5 million) of its total June TV budget on the “Nightlife” ad through June 18, when it abruptly stopped airing. However, the rest of the list was mostly a May retread, with smaller spending moves but no new creative.

Total top 10 pharma ad spending on TV media for June was $155 million, down just slightly from $160 million in May.

1. Humira
What is it?
AbbVie anti-inflammatory drug
Total estimated spending: $29.8 million (down from $34.3 million in May)
Number of spots: 9 (Four for arthritis, three for ulcerative colitis/Crohn's, two for psoriasis)
Biggest-ticket ad: “Body of Proof: Nightlife” for arthritis (est. $10.5 million)


2. Trulicity
Movement: Up from No. 9
What is it?
Eli Lilly GLP-1 diabetes drug
Total estimated spending: $19.9 million (up from $11.8 million in May)
Number of spots: Two
Biggest-ticket ad: “Make Your Own Insulin” (est. $11 million)


3. Lyrica
Movement:
Stayed same
What is it? Pfizer seizure and pain drug
Total estimated spending: $18 million (up from $15.7 million in May)
Number of spots: Eight
Biggest-ticket ad: “Most People” (est. $6.6 million)


4. Xarelto
Movement:
Stayed same
What is it? Johnson & Johnson next-gen anticoagulant
Total estimated spending: $14.2 million (down from $15.3 million in May)
Number of spots: Two
Biggest-ticket ad: “Learn All You Can” ($7.4 million)


5. Xeljanz
Movement:
Not on list in May
What is it? Pfizer oral rheumatoid arthritis therapy
Total estimated spending: $14.16 million
Number of spots: Two
Biggest-ticket ad: “Cactus” (est. $7.4 million)


6. Eliquis
Movement:
Up from No. 8
What is it? Pfizer and Bristol-Myers Squibb anticoagulant
Total estimated spending: $14 million (up from $12.5 million in May)
Number of spots: Three
Biggest-ticket ad: “What’s Next” (est. $13.9 million)


7. Verzenio
Movement:
Stayed same
What is it? Eli Lilly breast cancer drug
Total estimated spending: $13.7 million (up from $12.8 million in May)
Number of spots: Two
Biggest-ticket ad: “Relentless” (est. $12.8 million)


8. Latuda
Movement:
Down from No. 2
What is it? Sunovion Pharmaceutical anti-psychotic
Total estimated spending: $12.1 million (down from $16.2 million in May)
Number of spots: One
Biggest-ticket ad: “Maya’s Story”


9. Otezla
Movement:
Down from No. 5
What is it? Celgene's oral treatment for plaque psoriasis
Total estimated spending: $11.9 million (down from $14.8 million in May)
Number of spots: One
Biggest-ticket ad: “Little Things Can Be a Big Deal”


(Ad removed from iSpot at request of advertiser)

10. Victoza
Movement:
Not on list in May
What is it? Novo Nordisk GLP-1 agonist
Total estimated spending: $10.4 million
Number of spots: One
Biggest ticket ad: “Reduces Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke” (est. $6.2 million)
 

 

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