AbbVie and Pfizer return to the top of pharma's TV spending list for February

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Top spenders on pharma TV ads in February included AbbVie, Pfizer and Eli Lilly. (Xandr)

AbbVie’s Humira is back—at the top of the pharma TV ad spending pile, that is. In February, Humira was the No. 1 spender again, according to data from real-time TV ad tracker iSpot.tv, swapping places with Pfizer’s Xeljanz.

Pfizer has been spending more heavily to tout Xeljanz’ indication for ulcerative colitis with a TV ad that launched in December. It has spent more than $80 million in national TV media buys on that commercial since it began, according to iSpot data.

One newcomer to the list, Eli Lilly migraine drug Emgality, made the top 10 on the media-spending strength of its debut campaign, in which a mom who suffers from migraines enjoys an imagination-filled day with her young daughter. Gilead’s Truvada rejoined the list in February with its straight-talking “Honestly” PrEP campaign for HIV prevention that began last summer. Otsuka and Lundbeck’s antipsychotic also landed back in the top 10 with Rexulti’s latest TV commercial debut that continues the series of ads in which patients hold up smiley face masks to hide their symptoms of depression.

Overall, pharma TV ad spending among the top 10 slowed in February, totaling just under $150 million, a drop from $172 million in January and $178 million in December.

1. Humira
Movement:
Moved up from No. 2
What is it? AbbVie anti-inflammatory drug
Total estimated spending: $33.7 million (down from $34.9 million in January)
Number of spots: 13 (Six for arthritis, five for ulcerative colitis/Crohn's, two for psoriasis)
Biggest-ticket ad: “Body of Proof: $5 per month” (est. $7.1 million)


2. Xeljanz
Movement:
Moved down from No. 1
What is it? Pfizer oral RA and ulcerative colitis drug
Total estimated spending: $30.8 million (down from $40.5 million in January)
Number of spots: Four
Biggest-ticket ad: “A Different Direction” (est. $18 million)


3. Truvada
Movement:
Not on list last month
What is it? Gilead’s HIV and PrEP drug
Total estimated spending: $12.5 million 
Number of spots: One
Biggest-ticket ad: “On the Pill”


4. Emgality
Movement:
Not on list last month
What is it? Eli Lilly anti-CGRP migraine treatment
Total estimated spending: $11.7 million
Number of spots: One
Biggest-ticket ad: “Pirates”


5. Orilissa
Movement:
Stayed same
What is it? AbbVie drug for endometriosis pain
Total estimated spending: $11.3 million (down from $12.1 million in January)
Number of spots: Two
Biggest-ticket ad: “Or, I Can: Choose a Solution” (est. $6.9 million)


6. Rexulti
Movement:
Not on list last month
What is it? Otsuka and Lundbeck’s antipsychotic
Total estimated spending: $10.9 million
Number of spots: One
Biggest-ticket ad: “Good Works Kitchen”


7. Eliquis
Movement:
Down from No. 4
What is it? Pfizer and Bristol-Myers Squibb next-gen anticoagulant
Total estimated spending: $10.2 million (down from $13.7 million in January)
Number of spots: Four
Biggest-ticket ad: “Around the Corner” (est. $4.7 million)


8. Xarelto
Movement:
Up from No. 9
What is it? Johnson & Johnson next-gen anticoagulant
Total estimated spending: $9.9 million (down from $10.2 million in January)
Number of spots: Two
Biggest-ticket ad: “Selective” (est. $5.5 million)


9. Otezla
Movement:
Down from No. 6
What is it? Celgene oral treatment for plaque psoriasis
Total estimated spending: $9.5 million (down from $12 million in January)
Number of spots: Three
Biggest-ticket ad: “Summer Days” (est. $9 million)

(Commercial not available at request of Celgene.)

10. Jardiance
Movement:
Not on list last month
What is it? Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim SGLT2 diabetes treatment
Total estimated spending: $9.1 million
Number of spots: Two
Biggest-ticket ad: “Jardiance Asks: Heart” (est. $5.2 million)
 

 

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