Better together? AbbVie’s Humira and Pfizer’s Lyrica again outspend other brands

TV
Humira, Lyrica and Trulicity topped the list of pharma ads when it comes to TV commercial time bought in April. (islandjoe/CC BY 2.0)

AbbVie and Pfizer are becoming an item at the top of the pharma spending charts in 2018. For the fourth month in a row, drugs Humira and Lyrica are No. 1 and No. 2 on the list for TV ad spending, according to data from real time TV ad tracker iSpot.tv.

Eli Lilly’s Trulicity joined the duo as a returnee at No. 3, although for only the second month in a row.

Back on the top 10 list for April is Johnson & Johnson’s Xarelto at No. 4, after launching a pair of new TV ads during the month. Similar in tone and message as its previous work, each ad features two real patients talking about their experiences with atrial fibrillation, and in a separate commercial, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) blood clots. Both end with the patients advising, “Learn all you can to help protect yourself.”

Also back on the list for April were Novo Nordisk’s diabetes injection Victoza, Eli Lilly’s psoriasis drug Taltz, and Sunovion’s antipsychotic Latuda. Top ten pharma spending overall totaled more than $147 million for April, down slightly from $156 million in March, according to iSpot data.

1. Humira
Movement:
Stayed same
What is it? AbbVie anti-inflammatory drug
Total estimated spending: $29.6 million (up from $26.8 million in March)
Number of spots: Ten (Four for arthritis, four for ulcerative colitis/Crohn's, two for psoriasis)
Biggest-ticket ad: “Body of Proof” for arthritis (est. $7.4 million)

 

2. Lyrica
Movement:
Stayed same
What is it? Pfizer seizure and pain drug
Total estimated spending: $19.5 million (down from $23.1 million in March)
Number of spots: Six
Biggest-ticket ad: “Most People” (est. $5.7 million)

 

3. Trulicity
Movement:
Stayed same
What is it? Eli Lilly GLP-1 diabetes drug
Total estimated spending: $16.1 million (down from $22.1 million in March)
Number of spots: Two
Biggest-ticket ad: “I Can Do More” (est. $15.6 million)

 

4. Xarelto
Movement:
Not on list last month
What is it? Johnson & Johnson next-gen anticoagulant
Total estimated spending: $15.4 million
Number of spots: Three
Biggest-ticket ad: “Learn All You Can” ($13.8 million)

 

5. Xeljanz XR
Movement:
Up from No. 9
What is it? Pfizer oral rheumatoid arthritis therapy
Total estimated spending: $14.3 million (up from $10.3 million in March)
Number of spots: Three
Biggest-ticket ad: “Family Beach Day” (est. $7.4 million)

 

 

6. Otezla
Movement:
Up from No. 8
What is it? Celgene's oral treatment for plaque psoriasis
Total estimated spending: $11.4 million (up from $10.7 million in March)
Number of spots: One
Biggest-ticket ad: “Little Things Can Be a Big Deal”
(Commercial not available on iSpot by request of the advertiser)

 

7. Victoza
Movement:
Not on list last month
What is it? Novo Nordisk GLP-1 agonist
Total estimated spending: $10.8 million
Number of spots: Two
Biggest ticket ad: “Reduces Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke” (est. $6.2 million)

 

8. Cosentyx
Movement:
Down from No.5
What is it? Novartis next-gen psoriasis medication
Total estimated spending: $10.6 million (down from $13.4 million in March)
Number of spots: Two
Biggest-ticket ad: “Clear Skin Can Last 2” (est. $7.2 million)

 

9. Taltz
Movement:
Not on list last month
What is it? Eli Lilly next-gen psoriasis treatment
Total estimated spending: $10.2 million
Number of spots: One
Biggest-ticket ad: “Touch is How We Communicate”

 

10. Latuda
Movement:
Not on list last month
What is it? Sunovion Pharmaceutical anti-psychotic
Total estimated spending: $9.7 million
Number of spots: One
Biggest-ticket ad: “Maya’s Story”

 

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