Regeneron's Eylea snags prefilled syringe approval as Novartis rival looms

Regeneron
Regeneron's Eylea scored a nod for a prefilled injector application to treat four retinal conditions. (Regeneron)

Eye med Eylea has been a blockbuster sales force for Regeneron, but Novartis’ challenger brolucizumab is on the horizon. Could a new delivery option give Eylea a leg up?

That's what Regeneron's hoping. The FDA Tuesday approved a new prefilled injector for 2-milligram single doses of Eylea to treat patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), macular edema following retinal vein occlusion, diabetic macular edema and diabetic retinopathy.

The drugmaker touted the new approval as a game-changer for physicians, taking multiple preparation steps out of the original vial dose regimen. Eylea is now the only drug approved to treat four retinal diseases with a single-dose prefilled injector, although Roche's Lucentis has two prefilled injector doses that cover all four of those indications separately. 

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Regeneron is hoping the newest green light will help it secure its place as the top-performing wet AMD drug on the market as competitors loom.

RELATED: Regeneron's Eylea pads its armor with diabetic retinopathy approval

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