NIH's MERS vaccine looks promising in mice

Investigators at the NIH have developed a new MERS vaccine that looks promising in mice. Focusing on the structure of a viral protein that the MERS virus uses to enter cells, the researchers developed a two-step, prime-boost process. The booster was given several weeks after the priming injection. The mice produced neutralizing antibodies when infected with MERS and rhesus monkeys--which weren't directly infected--were also protexted from the severe lung damage caused by MERS. Read more

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