Torcetrapib - Pharma's Biggest Flops

Drug: Torcetrapib
Company: Pfizer

The promise: Hailed as a potential blockbuster that could take Lipitor's place, torcetrapib was a cholesteryl-ester transfer protein inhibitor (CEP-T inhibitor) designed to increase good cholesterol and lower bad cholesterol. Development of the drug began in 1990 with clinical trials starting nine years later. But it wasn't until 2006 that Pfizer got close to submitting the drug to the FDA. The company touted torcetrapib as the answer to its near-term pipeline woes, predicting the potential blockbuster could make up for billions of dollars in lost Lipitor sales when that drug went off patent in 2011.

What went wrong: In late 2006, the walls came crashing down around the company. Pfizer announced in December that it was halting development of it's prized Phase III asset. The decision came after an independent Data Safety Monitoring Board recommended terminating the study because of an imbalance of mortality and cardiovascular events. Results from a 15,000-person trial showed that patients taking torcetrapib with Lipitor experienced excess deaths than those taking Lipitor alone. Not long after torcetrapib demise, Pfizer announced that it was cutting 10,000 jobs. The company spent $800 million developing the drug.

Torcetrapib - Pharma's Biggest Flops
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