8. Cialis

Eli Lilly's Cialis faces generic competition in September under a settlement inked last year. (Eli Lilly)

Cialis
Company:
Eli Lilly
2017 U.S. sales: $1.359 billion
Disease: Erectile dysfunction
Patent expiration: Sept. 27

Erectile dysfunction blockbuster Cialis was on FiercePharma’s patent expiration list last year, but Eli Lilly managed to score a few more months of exclusivity in a July settlement with multiple generic drugmakers.

The drug’s primary patent expired in November, but Eli Lilly was able to use a 2020 unit dose patent to fend off the competition a little longer. Under the generic settlement, those drugmakers can start to market their copycats in September.

In a statement at the time, Lilly’s general counsel Michael Harrington said the 2020 patent was “valid and infringed” by drugmakers prepping their copycats. The deal includes a “royalty-bearing license agreement that provides us with more certainty regarding our U.S. exclusivity,” Harrington added.

RELATED: Lilly fends off Cialis generics with new patent settlement

First approved in 2003, Cialis has had quite a run on the market. Over the years, Lilly has grown its key ED brand with a great deal of advertising, building an identity around couples in bathtubs in TV ads and elsewhere.

But as key rival Viagra from Pfizer has already succumbed to generic competition, Cialis sales aren’t likely to go anywhere but down from recent levels. In the fourth quarter after Viagra started facing cheap competition, Cialis sales slipped 12% to $597 million.

Analysts with life science intelligence firm Evaluate have previously predicted the Lilly med will face a steep decline in the coming years, slipping to $55 million in sales by 2022. Teva, Sun Pharma and Aurobindo are among the drugmakers with tentative generic approvals, according to [email protected]

8. Cialis

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