Zydus Cadila preps for big splash into India's vaccines market

Zydus Cadila COO Ganesh Nayak

With ambitious plans for the next year, Ahmedabad-based Zydus Cadila's coming launches could alter the vaccines landscape in India and challenge established players there.

This week, the company announced in an earnings call that it intends to launch 10 vaccines in the massively populous country in the coming year. Candidates in its pipeline include vaccines to address influenza, measles/mumps/rubella/varicella, typhoid, DPT-Hib, hepatitis A, B, E, Japanese encephalitis, HPV and others.

On the call, COO Ganesh Nayak said the company plans to launch the shots in the private market first with later hopes of working into the government tender market. In total, Nayak said the new products are expected to bring in about Rs 250 crore ($39 million) over the next 3 to 5 years, DNA India reported.

The launches are sure to be watched by GlaxoSmithKline ($GSK), Serum Institute of India, and other local vaccine companies as the vaccine market in India--with a population of more than 1.2 billion people--is estimated at nearly Rs 3,000 crore ($500 million).

Having placed a commitment on vaccines and on high-volume sales through recent moves, GSK markets a combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine and jabs to address hepatitis B, influenza, HPV, varicella, Hib, and other conditions in India. Local player Serum Institute of India--among its other offerings--markets vaccines against hepatitis B, measles, influenza and Hib.

Zydus Cadila conducts its vaccines research at facilities in Catania, Italy, and Ahmedabad, India, and indigenously developed India's first H1N1 vaccine Vaxiflu-S. Its rabies vaccine plant--one of the largest in India--has received WHO prequalification, pitting it against Sanofi Pasteur, which also markets a rabies vaccine in the country.

- here's the DNA India story
- get more from FiercePharmaAsia
- and product info from ZydusGSK and the Serum Institute of India

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