New Survey Shows Only One-Third of Americans Know Their Cholesterol Levels

AstraZeneca reminds Americans to check their cholesterol levels during National Cholesterol Education Month

WILMINGTON, Del.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- A new AstraZeneca (NYSE:AZN) sponsored online survey of 1000 Americans reveals that the majority of American adults surveyed (57%) were concerned about their cholesterol, yet only 34% of people know their current cholesterol level.1 The survey also found that only 40% of those surveyed know that high cholesterol can cause atherosclerosis.1 Atherosclerosis is a serious disease which causes plaque buildup in the arteries over time.2

AstraZeneca reminds Americans to check their cholesterol levels during National Cholesterol Educatio ...

AstraZeneca reminds Americans to check their cholesterol levels during National Cholesterol Education Month (Photo: AstraZeneca)

Since September is National Cholesterol Education Month, AstraZeneca is encouraging adults to have their cholesterol levels checked. Adults with high cholesterol and additional risk factors–such as high blood pressure, diabetes, or family history of early heart disease–may be at increased risk for more plaque buildup in their arteries and should take steps to manage their high cholesterol. People who may have high cholesterol should work with their doctors to develop a cholesterol-management plan to help them reach their cholesterol goals.

“Knowledge is power, so it’s important for people to know their cholesterol levels so that they can take action early. If you have high cholesterol, one of the first steps to take is changing your lifestyle, such as exercising and eating a more healthy diet,” said Philip de Vane, M.D., executive director of clinical development, AstraZeneca.

“We encourage people to embrace National Cholesterol Education Month as an opportunity to be proactive about their health by getting their cholesterol tested and taking action to manage it, as appropriate,” continued Dr. de Vane.

When doctors check cholesterol levels using a blood test, they evaluate both LDL (bad) cholesterol and HDL (good) cholesterol plus another substance called ‘triglycerides’.3,4 LDL cholesterol is considered “bad” because too much of it in the blood can contribute to the slow buildup of plaque in the arteries over time, a serious disease called atherosclerosis.1

Managing Cholesterol

Adults over the age of 20 should have their cholesterol levels checked at least once every five years, according to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) guidelines.3 Total cholesterol is based on LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglyceride counts.3,4 Generally, lower total cholesterol levels (under 200 mg/dL) are considered desirable.2

If you or someone you know has high cholesterol, a doctor will likely recommend lifestyle changes, which can include quitting smoking, eating more healthy foods, and exercising more often.5 For some people, diet and exercise alone may not be enough, so it is important that people talk with their health care provider about their treatment options.

A doctor may recommend CRESTOR® (rosuvastatin calcium) when diet and exercise alone are not enough. Along with diet, CRESTOR is proven in adults to lower bad cholesterol by up to 52% (at the 10-mg dose vs 7% with placebo). CRESTOR is also FDA approved to slow plaque buildup in arteries as part of a treatment plan to lower cholesterol to goal.6 CRESTOR is not right for everyone, including anyone who has previously had an allergic reaction to CRESTOR, anyone with liver problems, or women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. Please see additional important safety information below.

The AstraZeneca-sponsored survey described in the first paragraph was conducted by StrategyOne using Toluna field services, was fielded online between May 19 and May 23, 2011 among a nationwide cross-section of 1,000 adults in the US aged 18 and older. The overall margin of error was ± 3.1 percentage points at a 95 percent confidence interval.1

About CRESTOR® (rosuvastatin calcium) Tablets

In adults, CRESTOR is prescribed along with diet to lower high cholesterol, and to slow the buildup of plaque in arteries as part of a treatment plan to lower cholesterol to goal.

Important Safety Information about CRESTOR® (rosuvastatin calcium) Tablets

CRESTOR is not right for everyone, including anyone who has previously had an allergic reaction to CRESTOR, anyone with liver problems, or women who are nursing, pregnant, or who may become pregnant. Your doctor should do blood tests before and during treatment with CRESTOR to monitor your liver function. Unexplained muscle pain or weakness could be a sign of a rare but serious side effect and should be reported to your doctor right away. Elevated blood sugar levels have been reported with statins, including CRESTOR. Be sure to tell your doctor if you are taking any medications. The most common side effects are headache, muscle aches, abdominal pain, weakness, and nausea.

Please read the full Prescribing Information.

If you have any questions concerning prescription-only CRESTOR, please visit CRESTOR.com or contact AstraZeneca at 1-800-CRESTOR.

About AstraZeneca

AstraZeneca is a global, innovation-driven biopharmaceutical business with a primary focus on the discovery, development and commercialization of prescription medicines for gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, neuroscience, respiratory and inflammation, oncology and infectious disease. AstraZeneca operates in over 100 countries and its innovative medicines are used by millions of patients worldwide.

For more information about AstraZeneca in the U.S. or our AZ&Me™ Prescription Savings programs, please visit: www.astrazeneca-us.com or call 1-800-AZandMe (292-6363).

CRESTOR is a registered trademark, and AZ&Me is a trademark, of the AstraZeneca group of companies. ©2011 AstraZeneca. All rights reserved. 1318103 8/11

1 Data on File, 1303202

2 “What is Atherosclerosis?” National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Available at: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/Atherosclerosis/Atherosclerosis_WhatIs.html. Accessed April 1, 2011.

3 Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III): Final Report. Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; September 2002. NIH Publication No. 02-5215. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/cholesterol/

4 Your Guide to Lowering Cholesterol with TLC: National Institutes of Health; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; December 2005. NIH Publication No. 06–5235

5 American Heart Association. Conditions. Cholesterol. Prevention and Treatment of High Cholesterol. 2010. Available at http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Cholesterol/PreventionTreatmentofHighCholesterol/Prevention-and-Treatment-of-High-Cholesterol_UCM_001215_Article.jsp. Accessed March 24, 2011.

6 Prescribing Information for CRESTOR

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CONTACT:

AstraZeneca
Media Inquiries:
Rachelle Benson,+1 302-885-5853
[email protected]
or
Stephanie Jacobson, +1 302-885-5924
[email protected]

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AstraZeneca reminds Americans to check their cholesterol levels during National Cholesterol Education Month (Photo: AstraZeneca)

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