J&J unit buys diagnostics company; Gleevec linked to muscle damage;

> Aiming to strengthen its Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics business, Johnson & Johson said its Nordic AB unit bought Sweden's Amic, which develops technology for faster diagnostic tests, for an undiclosed amount. Report

> French doctors reported a possible new side effect--muscle damage--associated with the Novartis cancer drug Gleevec (imatinib), used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia and gastrointestinal tumors. Report

> FDA approved an implantable medical device tested about five years ago on actor Christopher Reeve to help him breathe without a ventilator. Report

> Watson Pharmaceuticals  spent more than $295,000 lobbying for an approval pathway for generic biologic drugs during the first quarter. Report

> FDA told companies selling fraudulent cancer treatments--such as Tumorex and Breast Cancer Tea--to stop asserting that their products will work like drugs or face seizures, and possibly criminal charges. Report

> Cholesterol-lowering statins may prevent emergency Caesarean sections, researchers found, because high cholesterol weakens contractions. Report

> Theratechnologies is heralding positive Phase III data for its lead program--tesamorelin--for HIV-associated lipodystrophy. Report

> Merck Serono has signed up with Bionomics in a quest to develop new therapies for multiple sclerosis. Report

> J&J's Centocor won a key vote by an FDA expert committee backing the approval of ustekinumab for severe to moderate psoriasis. Report 

Live from BIO 2008

> Biotech has a bright future, but there are challenges ahead. Report

> Governor Arnold dropped by BIO yesterday to promote California's biotech industry. Photo slideshow

And Finally... Brighter Lighting led to clearer thinking in dementia patients, a study found. Report

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