Amgen to buy Pfizer plant in Ireland, saving 280 jobs

Amgen ($AMGN) has agreed to buy a Pfizer manufacturing plant at Dun Laoghaire, County Dublin, securing 280 jobs in the process. The transaction is expected to close in the second quarter of the year.

Under the terms of the agreement, 240 employees will transfer to Amgen; the other 40 will remain employed by Pfizer. Amgen will manufacture Pfizer's products at the facility for an interim period. Pfizer will lease a portion of the facility from Amgen for the time being. Amgen intends to develop the capability to formulate and fill its biological products at the site and expand manufacturing capabilities. The 37,000 square-meter aseptic operations facility has freeze dry product and liquid vial filling operations.

"As we expand internationally, the Dublin site will help us deliver a growing supply of Amgen medicines for patients worldwide," said Madhu Balachandran, senior VP, Amgen Manufacturing, in a statement issued by Ireland's Industrial Development Agency (IDA).  "We are impressed with the technical expertise and commitment to excellence demonstrated by the employees who work at the Dun Laoghaire site and look forward to welcoming them to Amgen's global manufacturing team."

Last year, Pfizer announced it would try to sell three of its Irish plants, and it has been working with IDA Ireland to find buyers, according to RTE News. Pfizer continues to explore opportunities to divest its Loughbeg and Shanbally plants in Cork, according to Business and Leadership.

Amgen has conducted commercial operations in Ireland since 2000 and employs about 25 staff members at its offices in North County Dublin, according to the IDA statement.

- see the IDA Ireland statement
- get more from RTE News
- check out the Business and Leadership report

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