AHA: AstraZeneca's Farxiga outcomes data look even better in patients without diabetes

Farxiga
AstraZeneca's Farxiga posted phase 3 trial data showing greater total CV risk reduction in patients without diabetes than those with Type 2 diabetes. (AstraZeneca)

PHILADELPHIA––AstraZeneca's SGLT2 med Farxiga has already stepped on the FDA fast track with trial data showing it could reduce heart failure risks in patients whether they have Type 2 diabetes or not.

Turns out those "paradigm shifting" data show an even greater cardiovascular benefit for patients who don't have diabetes than for those who do—and this for a drug designed specifically to treat the disease.

Farxiga cut the risk of cardiovascular events by 27%, compared with placebo, in patients without diabetes. In those with the disease, the risk reduction amounted to 25%, according to a late-breaking subanalysis from the phase 3 Dapa-HF trial presented Saturday at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions. 

In Dapa-HF, 45% of patients were diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and the remaining 55% weren't. Specific endpoints in the study showed a bit more of a mixed bag, according to Naeem Khan, AstraZeneca's medical vice president of cardiovascular and metabolic disease.

When it came to cardiovascular death, Farxiga cut that risk by 21% in patients with diabetes and by 15% in those without. On the flip side, patients with and without diabetes saw a 23% and 38% cut to the risk of heart failure incidents, respectively, Khan said.

"While the overall results have been truly groundbreaking, the subanalyses we're presenting here are really paradigm-shifting science," said Kiersten Combs, AstraZeneca's VP of U.S. cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

"The consistency of the results across the subpopulation really speaks to the quality of this data and what it's going to mean to heart failure going forward," she added.

RELATED: AstraZeneca's Farxiga steps on FDA fast track toward CV outcomes nod

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