U.N.-backed MPP expands license agreements for hep C, HIV therapies

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The U.N.'s Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) has signed a variety of sub-license agreements covering generics of four HIV antiretroviral treatments and hepatitis C therapy daclatasvir (Daklinza) from Bristol-Myers Squibb ($BMY), with manufacturing partners in India and China.

The license deal with India's Aurobindo Pharma,  Emcure, Hetero Labs, Laurus Labs, Lupin and new partner Zydus Cadila--among firms that also includes Shanghai-based Desano Pharmaceutical-- comes under a World Health Organization-backed effort to lower the costs associated with HIV, hepatitis C, tuberculosis treatments, according to a press release.

In hepatitis C, Zydus Cadila will be authorized to produce and sell daclatasvir in 112 low- and middle-income countries, along with Aurobindo Pharma, Lupin and Laurus.

In HIV, Aurobindo Pharma has signed two new sub-licenses to produce lopinavir and ritonavir (Kaletra) for Africa, along with Desano and Emcure. Hetero has signed to make sub-licenses for atazanavir (Reyataz) and raltegravir (Isentress) along with Laurus and Lupin added to their portfolio MPP-licensed drugs with agreements to produce daclatasvir and pediatric raltegravir, respectively, the statement said.

In June, GlaxoSmithKline ($GSK) unit ViiV Healthcare has won its largest ever national tender for HIV therapy dolutegravir (Tivicay) in Botswana under the MPP, with the therapy also manufactured under license by Desano in China.

The MPP said its 13 generic manufacturing partners are involved in over 60 projects to develop crucial treatments for both children and adults in developing world settings.

- here's the release

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