Over the moon? NASA develops motion sickness nasal spray

Epiomed Therapeutics is presumably over the moon--it's just signed an agreement to work with NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston to develop and market NASA's fast-acting intranasal scopolamine (INSCOP) to fight motion sickness. This could be a useful addition to the armamentarium of many people, from astronauts to parents with small children in the back of the car. Under the Space Act Agreement, Epiomed will formulate the anti-nausea drug scopolamine as a nasal spray--this is expected to act faster than the tablet form and be more convenient than an injection. "NASA and Epiomed will work closely together on further development of INSCOP to optimize therapeutic efficiency for both acute and chronic treatment of motion sickness, which can be used by NASA, the Department of Defense and world travelers on land, in the air and on the seas," said Lakshmi Putcha, developer of the innovative treatment strategy at Johnson. Press release

Suggested Articles

The new digital Abilify is a breakthrough for Proteus Digital Health and its patient-tracking products, but not so much for Abilify's maker, Otsuka.

A self-injection pen prefilled with Brussels-based UCB’s Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) has been made available this week in the U.K. after a positive opinion…

Everstone, a private equity firm specializing in India and Southeast Asia, has finally decided to shell out Rs 220 crore ($33 million) to obtain a 70% stake--a…