J&J adds 200 jobs with new biopharma plant at site in Ireland

Johnson & Johnson Janssen biologics plant Ringaskiddy, Ireland
Johnson & Johnson's new biologics facility in Ringaskiddy, Ireland adds more than 205,000 square feet and 200 workers. (Johnson & Johnson)

Johnson & Johnson's Janssen has had biopharma operations in Ringaskiddy, Co. Cork for nearly 15 years. Now it has a new $350 million facility and added 200 jobs. 

The official opening, which was announced by IDA Ireland, boosted the site’s size by 19,100 square meters (205,590 square feet). 

“Our Ringaskiddy facility is an important part of our global manufacturing network and expanding our capabilities here will allow us to pursue innovative solutions …” Kathy Wengel, J&J’s chief global supply chain officer, said in a statement. 

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The company started on the €300 million project in 2017. The additions included expansion of an existing warehouse, laboratory and administration buildings, and expansion of the wastewater treatment plant to accommodate increased volumes.

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At the time the company said the new plant would bolster capacity of APIs for drugs that treat “multiple myeloma, rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn’s disease.”  While it didn’t specifically identify the products to be made there, J&J sells blockbuster Remicade for rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn’s disease, as well as Simponi for treating rheumatoid arthritis and Stelara for treating Crohn's disease. 

According to a new forecast from GlobalData, Stelara is expected to be the ninth-best selling drug globally in 2025 with $7.5 billion in sales.

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