German-based Wacker Chemie buys Dutch biopharma site for undisclosed price

Handshake business deal executives
Munich-based Wacker Chemie purchased a Dutch biopharma manufacturing site and associated business from SynCo Bio Luxembourg for an undisclosed price. (Pixabay)

Wacker Chemie, a chemical company based in Munich, purchased a Dutch biopharma manufacturing site and associated business from SynCo Bio Luxembourg for an undisclosed price.

Wacker said it plans to keep all of SynCo’s 110 employees. The plant operates a pair of fermentation lines with current capacities of 1,500 and 270 liters that manufacture microbial-derived biopharmaceuticals for clinical testing and the commercial market. There is also a line of  single-use fermenters and a “fill and finish” facility.

“Expanding our production capacity strengthens our market position sustainably,” Gerhard Schmid, president of Wacker Biosolutions, said in a statement. “The additional fermentation lines double our current capacity, which increases our ability to produce key pharmaceuticals cost effectively, using advanced microbial techniques.”

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Live microbial products are seen in the industry as a promising new class of actives that offer innovative therapies for serious illnesses and new vaccines.

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