Finland's Fermion has completed an API plant expansion

Finland's Fermion has completed a €30 million expansion of its plant in Hanko. (Fermion)

Two years ago, Finland-based Fermion Oy decided it needed to replace the oldest manufacturing unit at its plant in Hanko. Now, that unit is ready to go.

Fermion announced recently that the €30 million project is complete. It will produce both potent active pharmaceutical ingredients for new products and continue producing APIs like azathioprine.

RELATED: Fermion plots €30M Finland API site expansion

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The unit will increase the plant's production capacity by approximately 50% from the current level, up to nearly 300 tonnes a year, Fermion Oy said in a release.

"New requirements for the manufacturing of APIs are continuously being introduced regarding the use and the quality of the facilities and the equipment. The new manufacturing facility will meet these requirements and ensure our preparedness to meet increasing demand regarding the pharmaceuticals under development by the parent company Orion,” Arto Toivonen, Fermion Oy president, said in a statement.

He said the unit will help Fermion focus in particular on the development of more challenging products. He pointed out that the market segment for high-potency APIs is growing faster on average than the market of all APIs.

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