Vygon opens Portuguese plant for chemotherapy devices

Ecouen, France's Vygon announced the completion of a €7 million ($8 million) 25,000 square meter in Paredes, Portugal to manufacture its drug delivering oncology devices. It intends to create more than 120 jobs in the area over the next five years.

Specifically, the facility will make the company's Qimono connectors for safe handling and administration of hazardous chemotherapy medications, according to a release.

It's described as a "pilot facility that will allow Vygon to move its new products from the design to the production stage." The plant can double its production facilities, and is expected to manufacture newly-launched products in the future, Vygon says, adding that it may decide to automate production at other sites, depending on the market for the new products.

The company now has 4 manufacturing facilities in France, and 1 in Belgium, Germany, Portugal, the U.S., Columbia and Mauritius. European facilities account for 89% of its products by value.  

"This new facility forms an integral part of our Vygview 2022 vision and our industrial infrastructure, with the aim of improving our responsiveness between the product design and the automated production phases," said Stéphane Regnault, chairman of Vygon's management board, in a statement. "The new plant has an important role to play in Vygon Group's growth. It will improve our ability to meet our customers' needs. The Qimono range taps into a fast-growing market that will help drive the Group's organic growth over the next few years."

Vygon makes a range of single-use devices, including catheters, intravenous needles, tourniquets, venous filters and humidifying filters.

- read the release (PDF)

Suggested Articles

The new digital Abilify is a breakthrough for Proteus Digital Health and its patient-tracking products, but not so much for Abilify's maker, Otsuka.

Adamis Pharmaceuticals' EpiPen contender Symjepi, which was rejected last year before the EpiPen havoc, won approval from the FDA.

Researchers in the U.K. have developed a technique to better predict results in liver cancer when drug-laden polymer beads are used to deliver medicines.