Nuvo Research granted U.S. patent for novel topical foam formulations that use DMSO to enhance drug delivery

Nuvo Research Inc. (TSX:NRI), a specialty pharmaceutical company with a diverse portfolio of topical and immunology products, today announced that the United States Patent Office has granted U.S. patent no. 9,107,823 ('823 Patent) covering novel topical foam formulations that include dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) together with certain drug actives. Nuvo has pioneered the use of DMSO as a carrier in topically-applied drug products which is a key component of the Company's U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved products, Pennsaid and Pennsaid 2%.

The claims of the '823 Patent protect foamable formulations comprising: (i) DMSO in a specified range; (ii) a pharmaceutically active agent that is an anti-inflammatory steroid, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) or a local anesthetic; and (iii) other specified ingredients. In particular, the patent covers Nuvo's novel IBUFOAM drug candidate that contains DMSO and the NSAID Ibuprofen. The anticipated expiry date of the patent is November 22, 2031.

"This patent provides broad intellectual property protection for foam formulations that use DMSO to enhance delivery of specified categories of known active drugs into or through the skin," said Tina Loucaides, Nuvo's Vice-President, Secretary and General Counsel. "The patent affords Nuvo another avenue to realize value from our investments and scientific accomplishments in topical and transdermal drug delivery. Our strategy is to make this patented dosage form platform, including IBUFOAM, available for development and out-licensing collaborations with partners who will fund completion of the development program."

Suggested Articles

The new digital Abilify is a breakthrough for Proteus Digital Health and its patient-tracking products, but not so much for Abilify's maker, Otsuka.

Adamis Pharmaceuticals' EpiPen contender Symjepi, which was rejected last year before the EpiPen havoc, won approval from the FDA.

Researchers in the U.K. have developed a technique to better predict results in liver cancer when drug-laden polymer beads are used to deliver medicines.