Delivery a lifeline in patent precipice; RNA nanoparticle delivers;

> As Big Pharma takes a leap off the patent cliff, drug-delivery innovation can help cushion the fall. In fact, it could be a lifeline. Not only that, but patients, themselves, will be administering more drugs as more look to lower health-care costs. Says one analyst: "We think in the future patients are going to be much more involved in their own treatments to reduce costs and smart drug delivery technologies are part of what is going to enable this change safely." Report

> Swiss biopharmaceutical company Telormedix is going to coordinate a two-year European Eurostars research project to develop liposomes for vaccine and adjuvant delivery. The $1 million project goes under the name Lipodel. More here

> Scientists figure out how to build an RNA nanoparticle that can be injected into the body to deliver therapeutics to targeted cells. Release

> Bridgewater, NJ-based Valeritas has completed a $150 million Series C round of financing led by Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe, which assumes a controlling interest in the company. The financing will support the commercialization of the V-Go disposable insulin delivery device. Story

> Unilife, a York, PA-based developer of drug-delivery systems, has developed what it's calling the AutoInfusor, a line of wearable needle-free auto-injectors meant for the rising numbers of patients who inject themselves outside a healthcare setting. The AutoInfusor attaches to the injection site and automatically infuses the drug through skin. The patient can go about his or her day and the device will indicate when it is done. Release

> Drug delivery patent application of the week: Dermal delivery Patent application

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