Bismuth not just for ulcers; Dr. Nano X

> Bismuth: It's not just for ulcers anymore. A bismuth citrate-based complex is a potential vehicle for drug delivery. Article

> Nevin Daniel, a senior at Ward Melville High School in East Setauket, NY, was first runner up in the individual category in the 2010 Siemens High School Competition in Math, Science & Technology. Daniel was awarded a $50,000 scholarship for his project to develop a new method for anti-cancer drug delivery using novel asymmetrical bow-tie PAMAM dendrimer conjugates. Release

> Celator Pharmaceuticals reports that elderly patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated with the company's CPX-351 (Cytarabine:Daunorubicin) liposome injection showed improvements in Phase 2 studies. According to Celator, CPX-351, which has been granted orphan drug status by the FDA for treatment of AML, represents a new approach to developing combinations of drugs in which drug molar ratios with synergistic anti-tumor activity are encapsulated in a drug delivery vehicle in order to maintain the desired ratio following administration. Celator release

> A Finnish SME has developed a biodegradable drug delivery technology for small molecule drugs and is looking for partners. Item

> A table summarizes the product pipeline maturity of North Carolina-based nanobio companies, including many involved in drug delivery. Download the PDF

> Drug delivery abstract of the week: Unique benefits of nanotechnology to drug delivery and diagnostics Abstract

> Drug delivery patent application of the week: Drug delivery systems using FC fragments Patent Application

> And Finally... Dr. Nano X--a video game in which therapeutic medicine comes from the barrel of a nanosize gun in the hands of Dr. Nano, who blows the bad diseases away--is coming to the iPhone. Report

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