Integrated Animal Health Initiates Proof of Concept Trials for First-in-Kind Oral Fly Repellent for Beef Cattle


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All-natural technology could also be destined for dogs and cats

LAWRENCE, Kan., Dec. 1, 2015 – Integrated Animal Health, LLC (IAH), a global company focused on identifying and commercializing new-to-the-world animal health solutions, is about to commence two well-controlled feedlot trials in Northern Australia for its all-natural oral fly repellent, Repellion.™ IAH also plans studies in 2016 with beef and dairy cattle at Kansas State University.

"The end game for this product is the improvement of cattle's environment and gain in the animal's live weight," says Blake Hawley, D.V.M., M.B.A., IAH president and chief executive officer. "The USDA has found that cattle can use up to 6 percent of their daily energy intake trying to rid themselves of fly burden, either by tail flicking, foot stamping and or skin shaking. If we can decrease the fly burden, then it follows that we will have a net increase in weight gain, and ranchers will see greater economic benefit."

Production losses due to flies are estimated at $2.2 billion in the United States.[1] Effective horn fly control alone can result in an additional 15 to 30 pounds of weight gain per calf over the summer months. Also important in lactating cows, effective horn fly control can reduce weight loss.[2] Flies spread diseases such as pink-eye and other zoonotic diseases. Most insecticide solutions today face resistance issues because of the very short life cycle of flies.

Easy as feeding
The IAH product technology is a variation of a fly and tick repellent for horses proven and used in the United Kingdom for more than a decade. The product is an all-natural, trade secret blend of plants, herbs, vitamins and minerals that, when consumed orally by the steers, creates a slight odor emitted through the sweat glands and hair follicles that has the effect of repelling insects, but is undetectable by humans. It is fed as part of a total mixed ration and acts like an "invisible shield" around the animal, including its manure.

"We knew the product worked on horses; it was just a matter of reformulating for use in a feedlot environment and then applying it to cattle rations," adds Dr. Hawley.


News-and-events-marquee

All-natural technology could also be destined for dogs and cats

LAWRENCE, Kan., Dec. 1, 2015 – Integrated Animal Health, LLC (IAH), a global company focused on identifying and commercializing new-to-the-world animal health solutions, is about to commence two well-controlled feedlot trials in Northern Australia for its all-natural oral fly repellent, Repellion.™ IAH also plans studies in 2016 with beef and dairy cattle at Kansas State University.

"The end game for this product is the improvement of cattle's environment and gain in the animal's live weight," says Blake Hawley, D.V.M., M.B.A., IAH president and chief executive officer. "The USDA has found that cattle can use up to 6 percent of their daily energy intake trying to rid themselves of fly burden, either by tail flicking, foot stamping and or skin shaking. If we can decrease the fly burden, then it follows that we will have a net increase in weight gain, and ranchers will see greater economic benefit."

Production losses due to flies are estimated at $2.2 billion in the United States.[1] Effective horn fly control alone can result in an additional 15 to 30 pounds of weight gain per calf over the summer months. Also important in lactating cows, effective horn fly control can reduce weight loss.[2] Flies spread diseases such as pink-eye and other zoonotic diseases. Most insecticide solutions today face resistance issues because of the very short life cycle of flies.

Easy as feeding
The IAH product technology is a variation of a fly and tick repellent for horses proven and used in the United Kingdom for more than a decade. The product is an all-natural, trade secret blend of plants, herbs, vitamins and minerals that, when consumed orally by the steers, creates a slight odor emitted through the sweat glands and hair follicles that has the effect of repelling insects, but is undetectable by humans. It is fed as part of a total mixed ration and acts like an "invisible shield" around the animal, including its manure.

"We knew the product worked on horses; it was just a matter of reformulating for use in a feedlot environment and then applying it to cattle rations," adds Dr. Hawley.

An early Repellion™ proof-of-concept trial set the feedlot industry buzzing, but not the flies. Robert Hines, a feedlot manager just outside Ballarat, Victoria, remarked, "I have been amazed that the steers have virtually a zero fly burden, and the flies aren't even landing on the manure, which is a huge bonus."

Dr. Hawley says they also are working to have the technology mixed into molasses for use in open paddocks, and other applications to meet the needs of ranchers with a variety of management and containment practices globally.

"We are of course thrilled to see such a visible outcome in Australia so quickly," says Rob Neely, IAH founder. "This product will soon be put on trial at Kansas State University, where fly burden will be measured. Then we will follow the animal through to slaughter to determine if changes to carcass composition occur. To round out the trial we also plan to undertake taste testing panels to ensure the integrity of the finished product. We believe the technology could ultimately end up in dog and cat food, providing a natural alternative to chemical pour-ons and systemically acting chewables. We are also looking at applications for other animals, including swine, goats and, of course, horses."

About Integrated Animal Health
Integrated Animal Health (IAH) provides multiple pathways to market for products that aim to disrupt current paradigms for the use of antibiotics, pesticides and novel animal drugs, biologics and cancer therapies used in animals. With world headquarters in the heart of the Animal Health Corridor, IAH is the new engine driving innovation in animal health by helping companies bring transformative solutions to market. Its technologies target significant and costly issues in production animal systems, such as mastitis, scours and fly control to help companies satisfy consumer demand for sustainable, natural and antibiotic-free products while meeting the demand for growth. Offering a deep and fertile pipeline of more than 30 pioneering technology platforms, IAH is advancing its pipeline to include a wide range of applications, including products targeting equine and companion animal markets. The company has offices at the Bioscience and Technology Business Center in Lawrence, Kan., as well as in Australia, Europe and New Zealand. For more information, visit IAHglobal.com.

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[1] J Med Entomol. 2012 Jan;49(1):198-209. Economic impact of stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) on dairy and beef cattle production.
[2] Beef Cattle Ectoparasites http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-1932/VTMD-7000web.pdf

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