GSK ends herpes vax development; Liquidia to start testing seasonal flu vax candidate;

Vaccine Research

GlaxoSmithKline's herpes vaccine failed to protect women against the virus in a trial, the U.S. National Institutes of Health said on Thursday, and the company said it was stopping development of the product. News  

Liquidia Technologies, a privately-owned nanotechnology company that develops particle-based therapeutics and vaccines, announced on October 5 that it will begin human testing of its seasonal influenza vaccine candidate LIQ-001 in a Phase I clinical trial. Article

Dynavax Technologies has reported that its novel hepatitis B vaccine candidate, HEPLISAV, given as two doses over four weeks demonstrated superior seroprotection in persons with diabetes mellitus compared to Engerix-B given as three doses over 24 weeks. Dynavax release

Influenza pandemics often come in multiple waves. As the one wave subsides, public health officials have to decide whether continuing vaccination programs is warranted to prevent or reduce a subsequent wave. In a new study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, researchers report on a new computer model that can be used to predict both subsequent-wave mechanisms and vaccination effectiveness. They conclude that additional waves in an epidemic can be mitigated by vaccination even when an epidemic appears to be waning. Story

Vaccine Market

As the northern hemisphere braces itself for the flu season, and for the first time the U.S. recommends flu vaccination for everyone over 6 months of age, Australia has confirmed that its main seasonal flu vaccine, Fluvax, caused convulsions in 99 children, all of whom recovered. Fluvax is made by the Australian firm CSL. Article

Next fall, seventh- through 12th-grade students in California will be required under a new state law to get a whooping cough booster shot before starting school, health officials said this week. Story

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