Health officials clash over whether to scrap malaria program

Health officials have clashed over the effectiveness of a pricey malaria program intended to provide cheap drugs for poor patients. In 2010, the Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria was founded by groups including United Nations agencies and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, Boston.com reports. The initiative--with a price tag of more than $460 million--was tested in 8 countries. The international charity Oxfam dubbed the program a failure, saying there was no proof it saved lives because officials didn't track who received drugs and therefore couldn't conclude whether they reached the right patients. Story

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