DNA origami delivers doxorubicin, downs resistance

In research published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society and picked up by the New Scientist, Chinese and U.S. researchers have used self-assembled origami-like folds in DNA to capture and carry the cancer drug doxorubicin into tumor cells, increasing drug uptake and killing both doxorubicin-sensitive and -resistant cell lines. "This is the first study to demonstrate that DNA origami can be used to circumvent drug resistance," Hao Yan of Arizona State University said to New Scientist, adding that the success of the nanostructure delivery system may be because the DNA is hiding the drug, or because it is affecting the pH in the cells. According to the researchers, DNA origami could have potential "as an efficient, biocompatible drug carrier and delivery vehicle in the treatment of cancer." Abstract | Article

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