Carbon nanotubes sneak drugs past gatekeeper proteins

Getting drugs past cell gatekeepers whose job it is to keep out harmful substances is one of the major hurdles of drug delivery. To get treatments past one P-glycoprotein on the cell's surface, researchers in Germany have developed nanoparticles made of carbon that can overcome this type of drug resistance, according to a study published in the International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design. Using computer models, the scientists demonstrated that these carbon nanotubes bypass the proteins undetected by not "docking" onto their defense mechanisms. Story | Study

Suggested Articles

Researchers in the U.K. have developed a technique to better predict results in liver cancer when drug-laden polymer beads are used to deliver medicines.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have changed the structure of a new cancer drug to allow it to more easily pass the blood-brain barrier, giving it access to…

Medtronic’s world-first FDA-approved hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery system might soon face competition, as T1D Exchange has pledged to invest in the…