Sirtex Medical Inc. Announces Record U.S. Earnings of $59 Million for Fiscal Year 2012

Sirtex Medical Inc. Announces Record U.S. Earnings of $59 Million for Fiscal Year 2012

Announcement Marks 32 Consecutive Quarters of Global Growth for the Company

WOBURN, Mass. (September 10, 2012) ––Sirtex Medical Inc., a subsidiary of Sirtex Medical Limited (ASX:SRX), a leading manufacturer of targeted, innovative liver cancer therapies, announced today revenue from sales of SIR-Spheres® microspheres in the U.S. grew 27 percent (32 percent on a constant currency basis) to AUS$57 million (US $59M) for fiscal year 2012. SIR-Spheres microspheres are the only fully FDA-approved microsphere radiation therapy for the treatment of colorectal liver metastases. U.S. dose sales of SIR-Spheres microspheres grew 31 percent for the quarter and 32 percent for the year ending June 30, 2012.

"In addition to our focus on increasing awareness of SIR-Spheres microspheres within the medical and patient communities, we also opened 50 new treatment centers across the country in fiscal 2012," said Mike Mangano, president of Sirtex Medical. "At the same time, we continue to educate physicians involved in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer on the benefits of adding SIR-Spheres microspheres to the treatment algorithm."

Globally, Sirtex reported that dose sales of SIR-Spheres microspheres grew 26 percent for the quarter ending June 30, 2012 compared to the previous corresponding period. Full year sales grew 23 percent compared to 19 percent the year before. U.S. dose sales of more than 3,900 contributed more than 63 percent of total global dose sales of 6,141.

Asia Pacific grew 48 percent for the quarter and 37 percent for the year in dose sales, while Europe also recorded growth of 11 percent for the quarter and 4 percent for the year in dose sales.
"We are dedicated to continuing education of the oncology community and ensuring patients diagnosed with metastatic colorectal cancer have SIR-Spheres microspheres as an easily accessible treatment option when they need it most," Mangano continued.

For more information visit www.Sirtex.com or find the latest updates on the SIR-Spheres microspheres Facebook page (www.Facebook.com/SIRSpheresmicrospheres).

About Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) using SIR-Spheres microspheres

Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT), also known as radioembolization, is a novel technology for inoperable liver cancer that delivers doses of radiation directly to the site of tumors. In a minimally invasive treatment, millions of radioactive SIR-Spheres microspheres are infused via a catheter into the liver where they selectively target liver tumors with a dose of internal radiation up to 40 times higher than conventional radiotherapy, while sparing healthy tissue.

Clinical studies have confirmed that patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with SIR-Spheres microspheres have response rates higher than with other forms of treatment, resulting in increased life expectancy, greater periods without tumor activity and improved quality of life. SIRT has been found to shrink liver tumors more than chemotherapy alone.

SIR-Spheres microspheres are approved for use in Australia, the United States of America (FDA approval), and the European Union (CE Mark) and additionally supplied in countries such as Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Taiwan, India, Israel, and Turkey. Available at more than 400 treatment centers, over 25,000 doses of SIR-Spheres microspheres have been supplied worldwide.

For more information, visit www.sirtex.com.

SIR-Spheres® is a registered trademark of Sirtex SIR-Spheres Pty Ltd

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