Pfizer pledges aid to embattled supplier Aurobindo

Pfizer supply partner Aurobindo Pharma recently ran afoul of the FDA, but the world's biggest drugmaker may ride to its rescue. Not out of charity, or at least not completely: A U.S. import ban affects four of Pfizer's injectable drugs.

Pfizer and Aurobindo inked a supply deal in 2009, under which Pfizer bought rights to 60 of the Indian drugmaker's products sold in more than 70 locations, including the U.S., Europe, and emerging markets, the Business Standard reports.

But based upon a December 2010 inspection at Aurobindo's plant near Hyderabad, the FDA imposed an import alert on products made there. Among those drugs are Pfizer's Cefazolin, Cefotaxime, Ceftazidime and Ceftriaxone. Pfizer now tells the Indian media that it will help Aurobindo fix its problems, once the drugmaker knows exactly where FDA's criticisms lie. "Once we understand FDA's concerns, we will work with Aurobindo to assist with next steps," a Pfizer spokesperson told the Press Trust of India.

Luckily for the U.S.-based drugs giant, most of the meds Aurobindo turns out on Pfizer's behalf are made elsewhere. According to the spokesman, "Most products manufactured by Aurobindo and sold by Pfizer are made at other Aurobindo production units and are not impacted by the import alert." Overall, Aurobindo expects to lose $2 million in sales per month as long as the issues remain unresolved.

- read the Business Standard story

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