Mylan Receives Approval for Generic Version of Hyzaar(R)

PITTSBURGH, April 12 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Mylan Inc. (Nasdaq: MYL) today announced that its subsidiary Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc. received final approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for Losartan Potassium and Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) Tablets 100 mg/12.5 mg, the generic version of Merck and Co., Inc.'s antihypertensive Hyzaar®. Additionally, the company received tentative approval for the 50 mg/12.5 mg and 100 mg/25 mg strengths, which are eligible for final approval on or around Oct. 4, 2010, upon the expiration of the first-to-file 180-day exclusivity period.

Losartan Potassium and HCTZ Tablets had U.S. sales of approximately $695 million for the 12 months ending Dec. 31, 2009, according to IMS Health, for all strengths and $93.8 million for the 100mg/12.5 mg strength, which Mylan has started to ship.

Currently, Mylan has 141 ANDAs pending FDA approval representing $96.2 billion in annual brand sales, according to IMS Health. Thirty-eight of these pending ANDAs are potential first-to-file opportunities, representing $19.8 billion in annual brand sales, for the 12 months ending December 31, 2009, according to IMS Health.

Mylan Inc. ranks among the leading generic and specialty pharmaceutical companies in the world and provides products to customers in more than 140 countries and territories. The company maintains one of the industry's broadest and highest quality product portfolios supported by a robust product pipeline; operates one of the world's largest active pharmaceutical ingredient manufacturers; and runs a specialty business focused on respiratory, allergy and psychiatric therapies. For more information, please visit www.mylan.com.

SOURCE Mylan Inc.

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