Medical Korea Concludes 'Korea Medical Charity Program' for 2011

SEOUL, South Korea, Dec. 2, 2011 /PRNewswire-Asia/ -- The Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare(Minister Rim, Chemin) and Korea Health Industry Development Institute(President Ko, Kyung-hwa) announced that thirty-one underage patients from eight countries received medical surgeries free of charge through its 2011 Korea Medical Charity Program.

The Korea Health Industry Development Institute said it has successfully completed the 2011 mission to offer cure for children patients from eight countries, including Russia, Mongolia, Vietnam, Egypt, Indonesia, China, Kazakhstan, and Cambodia, with eight leading Korean medical institutions.

Domestic hospitals which participated in the charity program are Samsung Medical Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Asan Medical Center, Severance Hospital, Sejong General Hospital, Yeson Voice Center and Hallym University Medical Center.

The project kicked off with six-year-old Volodkin Danila of Russia receiving surgery for congenital heart disease at Sejong General Hospital in January of this year. As of now, a total of 28 child patients have returned to their home countries healthy after successful operations and 3 are recovering at Korean Hospitals.  

Among the child patients who came to South Korea through this program, Nguyen Thi Phuc, a 2-year-old boy from Vietnam, was born without an anus and diagnosed with a heart disease as well. Sejong General Hospital, the first hospital to specialize in heart disease treatments in South Korea, said it successfully treated him.

Sokha Seak Kheang, a fourteen-year old Cambodian girl, was diagnosed with an atrial septal defect but was not able to receive proper treatments from Asan Medical Center.

The two women, Yurisa and Linia Laoli from Indonesia, suffered severe levels of burns below neck and facial area. Hallym University Medical Center invited them to offer state of the art intensive care for a month in October through this Korea Medical Charity Program.

Alina and Ruslan, a 5 year-old girl and a 9 year-old boy from Russia, were diagnosed with laryngeal papilloma and were graded as disabled people by their government. Yeson Voice Center offered cure for laryngeal papilloma which causes assorted tumors or papillomas to develop over a period of time.

For more information about Medical Korea's Korea Medical Charity Program', please contact Yang Ji-young of the Korea Health Industry Development Institute's Global Healthcare Business Department on [email protected].

SOURCE Korea Health Industry Development Institute

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