It's official: New FDA Commissioner Hahn wins Senate confirmation

Stephen Hahn
The Senate has confirmed Stephen Hahn as the next FDA commissioner. (MD Anderson Cancer Center)

The FDA has been plenty busy without an official commissioner since former head Scott Gottlieb stepped down earlier this year, but now it has a new chief to take on the job. 

Stephen Hahn, formerly chief medical officer of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, secured confirmation from the Senate Thursday in a 72-18 vote, according to reports. He takes over the agency's sprawling brief, which covers pharmaceuticals, food safety, medical devices and tobacco.

Much of the conversation during Hahn’s confirmation process centered on vaping, which the FDA governs under its tobacco division, but the nominee did face questions about biosimilars, drug pricing, shortages, opioids and more. He didn't offer much in the way of specifics but pledged to always follow science and data over politics. 

On pricing, Hahn said the American people "want action." An oncologist, Hahn said “rarely a day goes by” that drug pricing doesn’t affect one of his patients.  

It’s an “urgent” issue, and the “American people want us to act on this," he told lawmakers at a hearing. Hahn said he’s “very interested” in the ways the FDA can stimulate competition and lower costs. 

RELATED: FDA Commissioner nominee Hahn promises to put science above politics 

Hahn replaces Gottlieb, a popular FDA commissioner who stepped down earlier this year after nearly two years at the helm. As commissioner, Gottlieb prioritized the opioid crisis and implemented measures aimed at fighting high drug costs, among other initiatives; he since has joined the board of Pfizer.

But work at the agency didn’t stop between the two commissioners. Two acting commissioners kept things moving, and the agency has approved several new drugs in recent months.

Suggested Articles

Pfizer isn't giving up in biosims. This week, it unveiled launches to three Roche blockbusters, with two already on the market.

Novo Nordisk is betting big on GLP-1 Saxenda in its global obesity push, but England's cost watchdog is unimpressed with the drug's long-term outlook.

Tecentriq didn’t show benefit against simple observation at delaying cancer recurrence or death in patients with muscle-invasive urothelial cancer.