Court Rules on First Set of Patents in FENTORA Litigation

FRAZER, Pa., March 11, 2011 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ -- On March 11, 2011, the United States District Court for the District of Delaware issued a decision as to a portion of the patent litigation brought by Cephalon Inc. (Nasdaq: CEPH), ("Cephalon") and its wholly-owned subsidiary CIMA Labs, Inc., ("CIMA") against Watson Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and its wholly-owned subsidiary Watson Laboratories, Inc., (collectively "Watson") pertaining to Cephalon's FENTORA(R) fentanyl buccal tablet product. The Court ruled in Watson's favor on two of the three patents at issue in the case. The Court has yet to rule on the third patent.

"This decision does not resolve the litigation," said Jerry Pappert, Cephalon's Executive Vice President and General Counsel. "We remain confident in the strength of our claims with respect to the third patent. In the interim, we are reviewing the court's opinion with respect to the first two patents and are evaluating our options, including an appeal."

About Cephalon, Inc.

Cephalon is a global biopharmaceutical company dedicated to discovering, developing and bringing to market medications to improve the quality of life of individuals around the world. Since its inception in 1987, Cephalon has brought first-in-class and best-in-class medicines to patients in several therapeutic areas. Cephalon has the distinction of being one of the world's fastest-growing biopharmaceutical companies, now among the Fortune 1000 and a member of the S&P 500 Index, employing approximately 4,000 people worldwide. The company sells numerous branded and generic products around the world. In total, Cephalon sells more than 150 products in nearly 100 countries. More information on Cephalon and its products is available at http://www.cephalon.com/

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