LIFE SCIENCE LOGISTICS ANNOUNCES EXPANSION OF VAULT AND REFRIGERATED STORAGE CAPACITY TO MEET SHIFTING MARKET DEMANDS

LIFE SCIENCE LOGISTICS ANNOUNCES EXPANSION OF VAULT AND REFRIGERATED STORAGE CAPACITY TO MEET SHIFTING MARKET DEMANDS

(DALLAS, TX) – Sept. 10, 2015 - Life Science Logistics (LSL), a leading, national provider of healthcare supply chain solutions, today announced the opening of a new, state-of-the-art, 2,350 square-foot vault and a 2,700 square-foot expansion of its existing cooler (2 - 8°C) at the company's 394,000-square-foot Indianapolis facility.

According to Richard Beeny, CEO of LSL, the October 2014 reclassification of hydrocodone and other controlled substances from Class III to more strictly-regulated Class II drugs by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA), has significantly increased demand for its best-in-class storage and distribution solutions.

"We're also seeing increased demand for refrigerated space from our pharmaceutical and biotech clients," says Beeny, adding that LSL chose to expand at its Indianapolis location because of Indiana's geographic reach and the city's tax advantages for its clients. The addition is intended to anticipate and facilitate clients' growth by ensuring their ability to scale business operations in an outsourced environment.

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About Life Science Logistics

Founded in 2006, DFW-based Life Science Logistics (LSL) is a leading, national provider of end-to-end, high-quality, customizable healthcare supply chain solutions. For clients ranging from Fortune 500 companies to startups, LSL offers its pharmaceutical, medical device, and biotech clients the ability to outsource services ranging from distribution to kitting to back- and middle-office functions. FDA-registered and VAWD-accredited, LSL operates from four locations totaling more than 1.3 million square feet of cGMP compliant space.

 
 
 

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