Pfizer peddles advice for the lovelorn in Asia contraceptive campaign

Pfizer is launching a Love Connection campaign to support its contraceptive brand Harmonet in Asia.--Courtesy of Pfizer

If someone asked who you'd turn to for relationship advice, chances are you wouldn't say Pfizer ($PFE). But that could change. The drugmaker has set up a sort of Love Connection campaign to support its contraceptive brand Harmonet in Asia.

The brand revamp aims to promote peace, love and understanding among couples--with the help of Harmonet, of course. Relationship advice? That's front-and-center in a blog, with stories from a male point of view for her, and vice-versa for him, Marketing Interactive reports. A translation engine performs technical matchmaking by turning complaints into compliments for sharing on social media: Input a tirade against your partner, and the "BB translator" gives "sweet words" back.

Three pretty videos do double-duty for the campaign: They're made to be circulated, to drive traffic to the site, and they offer relationship pointers for visual learners. We liked the one where He is too busy playing video games to pay attention to Her, until she pulls out her "love socks," which save the day.

Helpfully, a tagline at the end of each video explains that there's no magic bullet--or magic socks, as the case may be--to solve your couple conflicts. For that, you'll have to go to the Harmonet site. Get it?

The whole campaign was masterminded by Secret Tour Hong Kong in collaboration with GroupM, Marketing Interactive says. To promote the three videos, the agency also created a parody movie marketing campaign on Hong Kong Movie.

- read the Marketing Interactive story

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