Veniti says first use of its Vici Verto stent system a success

Veniti stents
Veniti Verto stent system.

Veniti, a Missouri-based company focused on the treatment of venous disease, announced the first successful treatment of a patient with postthrombotic syndrome associated with venous outflow obstruction using its Vici Verto Venous Stent system.

The news comes just a week before the company is to present the product alongside its Vici Venous Stent at the Charing Cross Symposium in London.

“Frequently, in patients with extensive venous outflow obstruction causing Post Thrombotic Syndrome, it is necessary to extend the stents below the inguinal ligament to cover the entirety of the common femoral vein,” Stephen Black, a vascular surgeon at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Foundation Trust in London, who performed the procedure, said in a statement. “In these cases, accurate stent placement is essential to maintain inflow to the stent system from both the profunda and femoral veins.”

The stent is for use in the lower extremity and pelvic veins, including the iliac and common femoral veins, in patients with symptoms of venous outflow obstruction such as varicose veins and venous ulcers.

The Vici system, which has already received a CE mark, has two components: the stent implant and the disposable delivery system. The stent is laser-cut, self-expanding and made of a nickel titanium alloy (nitinol). The delivery system is a coaxial, over-the-wire design with an exterior shaft. It can be delivered via either a jugular or femoral vein.

- here’s the release
- read more here

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