Silence plans PIb/IIa for Atu027; Transient electronics could deliver drugs and then simply disappear;

> Silence Therapeutics has funding to take Atu027 to a Phase Ib/IIa open combination trial in incurable pancreatic cancer; completion expected around mid-2014. Article | Press release

> Cell Therapeutics' Opaxio (paclitaxel poliglumex) has been granted orphan drug designation by the FDA for the treatment of the brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme. Press release

> OptiNose's breath-powered bi-directional nasal technology delivers more of the migraine medication sumatriptan to the bloodstream in the first 15 minutes than a nasal spray or a tablet. Press release

> Medicure has developed a transdermal formulation of its lead drug, Aggrastat (tirofiban), for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome. Article

> Clarus Therapeutics could submit its oral testosterone to the FDA sometime next year. Article

> NextWave Pharmaceuticals has received FDA approval for Quillivant XR, its extended-release oral suspension of methylphenidate for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Press release

> Fuisz Pharma has received a patent for a film delivery system to improve buccal absorption of drugs. Press release

> Catalent has signed a supply agreement with Vivus to supply Qsymia capsules, a combination of phentermine and extended-release topiramate, a once-daily combination treatment for chronic weight management. Article

And Finally… Transient electronics, tiny biodegradable silicon and magnesium devices wrapped in silk and magnesium oxide, could deliver drugs and then erode away harmlessly over a few days or a few months, according to a multidisciplinary team at Northwestern University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Tufts University. Press release | Abstract

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