Reaching a new high with THC delivery through the gum; Merck's Tredaptive falls short in heart study;

Addiction and CNS disorders

> Researchers at the University of Mississippi are developing a transmucosal delivery system for tetrahydrocannabinol, one of the main actives in cannabis. The extruded transmucosal patch, which sits just above the gum line, can be made in all shapes and sizes and gets the drug into the system quickly and reliably, potentially cutting the dose needed compared with oral formulations. Press release

Musculoskeletal disorders

> Israeli company Polypid has raised $2.4 million in its third round of financing, with money from new and existing investors. Its lead product, BonyPid, which fills voids in bone and releases antibiotics, is in clinical trials. Article

> Simvastatin in hydrogels triggers bone formation. Abstract

Inflammatory disease

> Soligenix has regained North American and European commercial rights to oral BDP (beclomethasone 17.21-dipropionate) from Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals. Press release

Cardiovascular and metabolic disease

> Merck's ($MRK) Tredaptive extended-release niacin and laropiprant combination has not reached its primary endpoint in the HPS2-THRIVE (Heart Protection Study 2-Treatment of HDL to Reduce the Incidence of Vascular Events) study. The cholesterol drug is approved in 70 countries and launched in 40. Press release

> Coated nanoemulsions show potential for oral insulin delivery in animal models. Abstract

Drug delivery systems

> The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has granted Atlantic Pharmaceuticals two new U.S. patents for its tamper-resistant immediate-release and sustained-release SMART/Script drug delivery system. Article

> Australian researchers show that shape matters in nanosphere drug delivery. Article

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