Pfizer launches first self-injected contraceptive in the U.K.

Pfizer ($PFE) launched its newly labeled injectable contraceptive Sayana Press in the U.K. The product for women is the first in the nation to be approved for self-injection.

The medroxyprogesterone acetate contraceptive is a long-acting subcutaneous option supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Children's Investment Fund Foundation, both of which collaborated with Pfizer early on to broaden access to the drug in the developing world.

Pfizer's Salomon Azoulay

"With this revised label, following consent from a healthcare professional and with proper training, U.K. women will now have the opportunity to administer Sayana Press outside of a clinical setting," Pfizer Global Established Pharma Business senior vice president and chief medical officer Salomon Azoulay said in a statement. "This is an exciting milestone for women in the United Kingdom, and, potentially, in countries around the world, who might prefer this method of contraception and mode of administration."

Pfizer has focused on countries such as Burkina Faso, Senegal and Uganda to promote the contraceptive, where self-injection could also be a better way to administer the drug outside of the clinical setting.

"Helping to broaden access to Sayana Press is a key priority for Pfizer," Pfizer Global Established Pharma Business President John Young said in a statement. "Through the tremendous efforts and ongoing collaboration with our Partners, we have already made great progress in bringing Sayana Press to thousands of women living in sub-Saharan Africa. We hope to continue the great momentum achieved, enabling us to further help address the specific family planning needs of women in the developing world."

- here's the release

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