Pfizer deal shows confidence in Santaris' RNA delivery

The recent expansion of a deal between Pfizer and Santaris Pharma is reported in FierceBiotech, but it's worth reviewing the reason why Pfizer seems excited about the mRNA and microRNA targeted therapies being developed by Santaris.

We've reported before about the problems associated with gene-silencing RNA technology. The problem is finding a way of effectively delivering the interfering RNA to the right spot. Santaris claims to have solved this problem "without the need for complex delivery devices."

According to Santaris, RNA-targeted therapies come in two varieties: single-stranded approaches often referred to as "antisense"; and double-stranded approaches often referred to as "siRNA." The company's LNA Drug Platform uses Santaris' proprietary single-stranded LNA chemistry, which may provide the key to delivering on the promise of RNA-targeted therapies today by overcoming the limitation of earlier antisense and siRNA technologies. The company claims it has found a "unique combination of small size and high affinity" allowing LNA-based drugs to potently and specifically inhibit RNA targets in different tissues.

If Santaris really has found a solution to the decade-plus-old RNA delivery dilemma, then it's no wonder Pfizer wants in on the action.

- read more in Drug Discovery & Delivery
- and the FierceBiotech report

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