NextWave, Tris Pharma help the medicine go down

At times, parents need to defy the laws of physics to get a child to unclamp his or her jaw to get necessary medication. That's why new extended-release liquids are so appealing for drug delivery. "Drink this" often goes down better than "swallow this."

NextWave Pharmaceuticals, based in Cupertino, CA, and New Jersey-based Tris Pharma have announced that they're collaborating on liquid formulations of central nervous system pharmaceuticals. Tris Pharma develops what it calls its OralXR+ platform, which enables sustained release in child-friendly liquid, chewable and strip forms. It makes it unnecessary to swallow a pill, and the sustained release formulation deters abuse of opoids. NextWave focuses on treatment of child and adolescent ADHD and related disorders.

NextWave will commercialize Nexiclon XR (clonidine) extended-release tablets and suspension, which the company says is the first ever 24-hour liquid extended release product approved by the FDA. Nexiclon XR has been cleared for marketing by the FDA and will be introduced to wholesalers and pharmacies by NextWave in the second half of 2010. NextWave and Tris will also collaborate on the development of three additional central nervous system products, with an option to expand development to additional products. All products under the agreement incorporate Tris' OralXR+ technology.

"Long acting products that do not require swallowing remains an unmet need of the industry," Jay Shepard, chairman and CEO of NextWave, said in a prepared statement. "With our products, we intend to focus on this unique opportunity."

- read the NextWave and Tris release

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