Mystic scores two platform patents for intraocular, intranasal delivery

Mystic's VersiDoser platorm is used to deliver liquid drugs to the eye.--Courtesy of Mystic

Delivery specialist Mystic Pharmaceuticals snagged U.S. patents for two of its platforms, VersiDoser for liquid ophthalmic and intranasal drugs and VRx2 for intranasal powders, both used to treat ocular, CNS, neurodegenerative and infectious diseases.

Austin, TX-based Mystic looks to solve problems of dosage and solution, bringing about its VersiDoser eyedropper, a device that houses individually packaged eye drops designed to precisely deliver the right amount to the eye, as opposed to the less controllable bottles of eye drops currently on the market. VersiDoser also comes in an intranasal version for liquid delivery to the nose.

The VersiDoser in particular is said to reduce drug waste by as much as 70% to 80%, reducing the cost of goods manufactured by as much as 65%, the company notes on its website.

The VRx2 intranasal system allows highly controlled delivery, as well, the company explains, calibrated to dispense a precise dose in volumes ranging from 25 microliters to 150 microliters. It also supports the reconstitution of the powder, as well as the combination of two separately packaged liquids, Mystic explains on the website.

"There is a power shift in the pharmaceutical industry from product-oriented to patient-oriented products that deliver better health outcomes," Mystic CEO Timothy Sullivan said in a statement. "Over the past decade Mystic has innovated packaging and delivery technologies that enable the development of patient-centric pharmaceutical products. These latest innovations further expand our capabilities to enhance the patient experience by making pharmaceutical products that are safer, easier and more convenient to use."

- here's the release

Suggested Articles

Kala Pharma's Eysuvis on Tuesday became the first and only corticosteroid approved to treat short-term signs and symptoms of dry eye disease.

Xeris scored an FDA fast track designation for its diazepam formulation, delivered via autoinjector, to treat acute repetitive seizures.

Armed with microrobots and magnetic fields, Pursue scientists are looking to the future of targeted drug delivery, starting with the colon.