MonoSol Rx, KemPharm partner on abuse-resistant ADHD drug

Those who suffer from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are usually presented with a dilemma that goes along with treatment options. The drugs that help sufferers stay focused are stimulants, or amphetamines, which also contain the risk of addiction and a host of problems potentially worse than the ADHD. Here is where a better drug-delivery system is needed--to ensure that stimulant drugs such as Ritalin, Concerta or Vyvanse are used properly and not abused. MonoSol Rx, a company that specializes in developing fast-dissolving thin-film versions of existing drugs, thinks it has a solution to the problem and has partnered with KemPharm, which is developing a new amphetamine-based drug for ADHD.

"Our dosage form, in conjunction with KemPharm's KP106, has the potential to offer a safer, abuse-resistant and more effective treatment option for ADHD, which is particularly important given the concerns of patients, parents and caregivers regarding the risks associated with currently marketed ADHD drugs," A. Mark Schobel, MonoSol Rx president and CEO, said in a statement.

KP106 is KemPharm's ADHD treatment that, according to the company, has demonstrated in Phase I trials pharmacokinetics that predict a superior safety profile compared to Shire's Vyvanse. The company also said KP106 "may offer unique abuse deterrent properties" compared with other amphetamine-based treatments. KP106 is composed of d-amphetamine and a ligand. KemPharm is attempting to market the first thin-film dosage form for ADHD and predicts filing a new drug application by the end of 2012.

- read the release from MonoSol and KemPharm

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