Market for next-gen insulin pens and pumps will "explode"

New and better pens and pumps designed to improve insulin delivery have made it easier for diabetics to control blood glucose levels while minimizing the side effects of the disease, according to one of the experts in the field. And the development of automated glucose-controlled insulin infusion systems combining the advantages of continuous glucose measurement with intravenous insulin infusion pumps "is likely to explode over the next several years," predicts Jay Skyler, MD, professor of medicine at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. "Improved delivery devices for insulin treatment have increased patient compliance and acceptance of an intensive insulin strategy," which can result in significant reductions in long-term complications associated with poorly controlled type 1 and type 2 diabetes, says Satish Garg, MD, Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at the University of Colorado Denver. Report

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