Inhalable dry powder could treat TB; Psoriasis treatments could move beyond topical delivery;

> An inhalable dry power, composed of fine particles of antibiotics, might be an efficient way to distribute antibiotics deep in the lungs of TB patients to get at protected lesions that are difficult to access by current treatments. Lead researcher J'aime Manion and her colleagues from the University of Colorado developed the powder. More

> Topical delivery is used for most sufferers of psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory skin disorder. But that method, based on conventional excipients, only works to a limited extent. With the advent of newer biocompatible and biodegradable materials like phospholipids, and cutting-edge drug delivery technologies like liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), microemulsions, and nanoemulsions, the possibility to improve the efficacy and safety of the topical products has increased. Abstract

> Scientists see if nanotubes can be used for drug delivery into plants. The conclusion? They kill plant cells initially, but damage is limited. Release

> MicroDose Therapeutx and Nexus6 are partnering. MicroDose will now sell its electronic dry powder inhaler with Nexus6's SmartinhalerLive technology built-in. MicroDose's inhaler will now be able to wirelessly upload dosing and compliance information from the inhaler to a web-based server for data management and reporting. Release

Drug delivery job of the week: Senior Associate Scientist, Drug Delivery, Pfizer, Andover, MA. Job listing

Drug delivery patent application of the week (and longest of the year): Gold nanoparticle composition, DNA chip, near infrared absorbent, drug carrier for drug delivery system (DDS), coloring agent, biosensor, cosmetic, composition for in vivo diagnosis and composition for therapeutic use. Patent Application

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