Hospira names new chief executive; IntelGenx discloses board resignation;

> In a recent report, the trade publication InPharm drills down to the major drug-delivery and business challenges facing the beleaguered field of RNA-interference therapies. Report

> Critical Pharmaceuticals of Nottingham, UK, reports that it is preparing to move forward with a Phase I clinical trial after preclinical tests provided positive data on the tolerability of its nasal formulation of human growth hormone. Release

> Lake Forest, IL-based Hospira ($HSP), a provider of specialty and IV drug products, reported that F. Michael Ball, president of Allergan, has been elected as the firm's new CEO. Ball will replace founding CEO Christopher Begley, who is becoming executive chairman of the company. Story

> IntelGenx Technologies ($IGX:CN), a developer of oral controlled-release drugs, reported that Thomas Kissel has resigned from the firm's board of directors effective immediately, noting that there "were no disagreements or misunderstandings between professor Kissel and the company" and the firm's board plans to appoint a new director to replace him in the near future. IntelGenx release

> Calypso Medical Technologies, a Seattle-based provider of a prostate-tracking system for use in guiding the delivery of radiation therapy, has raised $7.5 million in a debt and rights financing round, according to a regulatory filing. Filing

> A group from the Magee Woman's Research Institute at the University of Pittsburgh is developing experimental lubricants that have the potential to carry antiviral agents and other drugs to help prevent the spread of HIV. Release

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