Forbes gives drug delivery a shoutout, says it can make good drugs great

Drug delivery is proving to be a useful and economical source of innovation due to the difficulty and cost of finding new molecular drug candidates, Forbes says in its article. "Is the future of pharma about making good drugs great?" It mentions companies like MannKind ($MNKD), which is attempting to market inhaled insulin, Actavis ($ACT), which just got an intrauterine delivery device for a common contraceptive drug approved, and OptiNose, which is focused on intranasal delivery of compounds like previously approved oxytocin. "Better delivery not only lowers the cost of development and optimizes drugs--by using less, speeding delivery or improving results--it also allows drugmakers to extend patent protections on what would be an otherwise lower-margin generic medicine. That allows for more pricing power because of improved outcomes and renewed exclusivity," Forbes writes. (Amgen's ($AMGN) newly launched Neulasta Delivery Kit is a case in point. The blockbuster's patent expires in October.) More

Suggested Articles

The new digital Abilify is a breakthrough for Proteus Digital Health and its patient-tracking products, but not so much for Abilify's maker, Otsuka.

Adamis Pharmaceuticals' EpiPen contender Symjepi, which was rejected last year before the EpiPen havoc, won approval from the FDA.

Researchers in the U.K. have developed a technique to better predict results in liver cancer when drug-laden polymer beads are used to deliver medicines.