Eisai's Alzheimer's patch released next year; Titan gets SBIR for Parkinson's treatment;

> With Eisai's patent protection for the Alzheimer's drug Aricept going off patent in November, the Japanese company is looking for a patch version of the drug to help make up for anticipated sales loss to rivals. Eisai may begin patch sales as early as the second quarter of 2011. Report

> Near the beginning of the month, we reported on Alimera Sciences submitting marketing authorization application in the UK for treatment of diabetic macular edema using the Atlanta-based company's Iluvien sustained drug delivery system. Retired opthalmic consultant Irv Arons this week wrote an excellent, thorough history and explanation of Iluvien on his blog, including the delivery platform licensed from pSivida, complete with links and photos. Blog

> SurModics has kept itself in the news for three straight weeks, this time with the Alabama-based drug-delivery developer announcing a "continuation of feasibility collaboration" with EGEN, a biopharmaceutical company focused on developing DNA and RNAi therapeutics. Release

> Titan Pharmaceuticals, based in South San Francisco, has been awarded an SBIR grant by the NIH to support development of a long-term, non-fluctuating dopamine agonist treatment for Parkinson's disease. Tital will receive $300,000 in August, and another $195,000 in 2011 to develop its ProNeura technology for a subcutaneous implant that provides round-the-clock delivery of dopamine agonists while maintaining a stable, non-fluctuating plasma drug level for six months or longer following a single treatment. Release

And Finally... The most interesting logos in biotech. Repot

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