Capsugel adds microdose capabilities to its French facility

Capsugel adds microdose capabilities to its French facility
Amit Patel, president of Capsugel

Capsulemaker and drug formulation specialist Capsugel said it is adding microdose capabilities at its Ploërmel, France, facility.

The added services are a direct result of the New Jersey-based company’s purchase earlier this year of Xcelience, a specialized contract development and manufacturing organization based in Tampa, FL. The company replicated Xcelience’s operations at Capsugel’s French facility, positioning Capsugel to begin offering microdosing capabilities in both North America and Europe.

“By leveraging best practices pioneered by Xcelience, an array of Xcelodose technologies and our high-containment capability, we have further strengthened our speed-to-product toolkit, enabling us to deliver even greater value to our customers,” Amit Patel, president of Capsugel, said in a statement.

In addition to the Xcelience purchase in January, Capsugel also snapped up Powdersize, a Quakertown, PA-based contract manufacturer with expertise in particle size reduction. Terms weren’t disclosed in either deal.

In late March, Reuters reported the company was preparing to explore a sale or a public offering that could value Capsugel at more than $5 billion including debt, according to unnamed sources. The news service said companies such as 3M ($MMM), Danaher ($DHR), Becton Dickson ($BDX), Thermo Fisher Scientific ($TMO), Bayer and Catalent ($CTLT) had all expressed interest in acquiring the company.

Capsugel is owned by private equity firm KKR ($KKR), which Reuters said was looking at a possible sale as well as exploring an IPO versus a straightforward sale.

- here’s the news release
- read more here

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