Bristol-Myers Squibb launches autoinjector for treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis

Bristol-Myers Squibb ($BMY) unveiled the Orencia ClickJect autoinjector, which is designed for self-administration of Orencia to treat moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis.

The device can deliver 125 mg of subcutaneous Orencia through a push-button operation with injection confirmation to reduce the possibility of user errors, the company said.

Rheumatoid arthritis--usually referred to as RA--is a systemic, chronic, autoimmune disease that can inflame the lining of the joints, causing joint damage as well as chronic pain, stiffness, and swelling. RA can also limit range of motion and decrease joint function.

The condition is more common in women, who account for 75% of patients diagnosed with RA, than in men.

“Rheumatoid arthritis often affects joints in the hand and impairs dexterity,” Dr. Sheila Kelly, who oversees Orencia in the U.S. for the company, said in a statement. “Through the new Orencia ClickJect, we are able to offer the proven benefits of Orencia in an accurate dose self-injection and provide an additional option for healthcare providers when selecting treatment options for their patients.”

The device automatically delivers the full dose of the drug with one push of a button, and a viewing window on the device tells a patient that the full dose has been delivered. The tip of the ClickJect’s Autoinjector automatically locks and covers the needle after injection to help prevent accidental needle sticks.

The drug Orencia was the focus of a heated patent dispute between Bristol-Myers and Repligen more than a decade ago. Bristol-Myers eventually agreed to  pay $5 million plus royalties on U.S. net sales of Orencia to settle the spat.

- check out the release

Read more: 
BMS, Repligen settle Orencia fight 
Bristol-Myers starts Orencia manufacturing at new plant  
NICE issues final guidance recommending 7 drugs for rheumatoid arthritis

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