Aptar Pharma readies auto-injectable drug delivery tech

Aptar Pharma ($ATR) has taken a major leap beyond spray pumps and inhalers. At a November conference, it debuted prefilled, auto-injectable drug delivery technology designed to help it attract more biopharmaceutical clients.

Aptar Pharma gained access to the new technology in 2012, when parent AptarGroup agreed to buy France's Stelmi group for $207 million. Nearly a year-and-a-half later, in-Pharma Technologist reported that the company rolled out the new Pro-Ject platform at the PDA Europe Conference in Basel, Switzerland, earlier in November.

Why does this matter? Aptar Pharma wants the world to know that its drug delivery technology capabilities have moved well past inhalers and spray pumps, both staples for the company. Biopharmaceutical sales are continuing to explode and Aptar wants a bigger piece of the action, specifically more clients whose drugs require unique drug-delivery options such as injection. So it highlighted every bell and whistle at the conference that it could, noting that the drug delivery system included a prefilled syringe, large control window, acoustic feedback and a number of safety features, according to the story.

Aptar's acquisition of Stelmi Group gave it two new manufacturing facilities in France as well as an R&D center. Stelmi specialized in rubber-based delivery platforms. After months of development, it is now time to see if the Stelmi acquisition will pay off.  A company spokesman at the launch event hinted that Aptar would be hitting the market with a number of new injection devices down the line. Those products would add to an overall line at parent AptarGroup that also includes "dispensing systems" for fragrances and cosmetics, personal care, and the household and food/beverage markets.

AptarGroup is based in both the U.S. and France.

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